An Independent Episcopal Day School for Ages 3 Through 12th Grade in Burlington, New Jersey

Curriculum Guide



Upper School
Course Selection Guide


Course Descriptions

Choosing Your Courses


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2016-17

US Arts

At Doane, students are encouraged to choose an Arts Major course and an Arts Minor course in order to immerse themselves in the Arts, express themselves creatively in multiple ways, and make connections across different artistic disciplines. Courses designated as Major meet for one hour three out of every six school days while courses designated as Minor meet for one hour two out of every six school days. Students may choose only a Major or Minor option unless otherwise noted. Completion of a Major course earns a student 1 credit, and completion of a Minor course earns a student a .5 credit.

Doane Academy views the development of character and leadership qualities in our students as a priority equal in importance to academic achievement. This stance has made “Strong Ethical Leadership” a cornerstone of our educational program, permeating everything that we do in the classrooms, on the athletic fields, and beyond. Our Upper School curriculum reinforces this commitment through a series of required grade-level cycle courses.

Band Class (rehearsals)

  • Instructor: Adrienne Mazar
  • Grade Level: 7-12
  • Requirement Information: Fulfills 1 of 1 required Fine or Performing Arts credits when taken in high school
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Major/Minor Designation: Major
  • Honors Option: N/A

In band classes (rehearsals), the ensemble will study music theory and read and prepare a variety of concert band music which has been selected to be appropriate for the playing level of the band. In addition to attending all rehearsals, band students are required to take one music lesson per week given by the band director.

This course is for those who successfully demonstrate the ability to play the music found in Book I of a nationally recognized band method. Students in band must own or be currently renting their own instruments.

Ceramics

  • Instructor: Jackie Bak
  • Grade Level: 7-12
  • Requirement Information: Fulfills required Fine/Performing Arts credit when taken in high school as a Major option. Fulfills .5 of 1 required Fine/Performing Arts credit when taken in high school as a Minor option.
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Major/Minor Designation: This course can be selected as either a Major or a Minor Arts option.
  • Honors Option: N/A

Students will learn to build functional pottery using low fire/earthenware clay. Students will use the slab roller, extruder, and potter’s wheel to create bowls, vessels, and sculptural pieces. These pieces will be kiln fired and glazed.

Graphic Design

  • Instructor: Jack Newman
  • Grade Level: 7-12
  • Requirement Information: Fulfills .5 of 1 required Fine/Performing Arts credit when taken in high school
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Major/Minor Designation: Minor
  • Honors Option: N/A

In this working studio class, students learn to solve visual problems using Adobe Photoshop CS and Adobe InDesign CS through demonstrations and hands-on work. Students will work on traditional design layouts and learn to solve the problems which arise when creating publications. The class provides students with the skills to use Adobe Photoshop CS, In-Design, and Image-In. All students will participate in the following: working with basic magazine-style/layout, type selection, color and theme selection, and advertising sales techniques as related to yearbook production. Additional instruction is given in copywriting and fitting, photo selection and fitting, and page assembly. Expect daily design assignments as well as layout, writing, and interview assignments as we work to produce the yearbook.

Jazz Ensemble

  • Instructor: Adrienne Mazar
  • Grade Level: 7-12
  • Requirement Information: Fulfills .5 of 1 required Fine/Performing Arts credit when taken in high school
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Prerequisites: Students must be enrolled in Band in order to enroll in Jazz Band. Auditions are required.
  • Major/Minor Designation: Minor
  • Honors Option: N/A

All members of the Jazz Ensemble must be enrolled in Concert Band as their primary performing ensemble. This performance class is an extension of the larger ensemble experience. Students wishing to perform in the Jazz Ensemble must be approved by the director and be proficient on their instrument in at least four sharps and four flats, chromatic scales, and some modes. Percussionists must be able to adequately perform on drum set and traps in multiple styles, including swing, Latin, rock, funk, and fusion.

The Jazz Ensemble reflects traditional Big Band instrumentation (saxophone, trumpet, trombone, and rhythm section). Through listening to recordings, critiquing, analyzing, discussion and application, students will learn a variety of jazz styles found within this genre. Students will understand the history of jazz and be able to associate specific musicians to distinct types of jazz. This is a performance class; therefore, students are expected to attend all rehearsals, sectionals, and performances

Studio Incamminati Advanced – Contemporary Realist Art

  • Instructor: Robin Frey, Jarred Fisher
  • Grade Level: 9-12
  • Requirement Information: Fulfills .5 of 1 required Fine/Performing Arts credit when taken in high school
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Pre-Requisites: Students must be enrolled in Studio Incamminati as a Major in order to enroll in Studio Incamminati – Advanced as a Minor.
  • Major/Minor Designation: Minor

This course meets for an hour on two out of every six school days. It is an extension of the Studio Incamminati course, and therefore students can enroll in it only if they choose that course as their Major option.

This course offers students who are passionately committed to creating realist art the opportunity to further enhance their skills. These students will get additional one-on-one time with the instructors and push themselves to improve in a class environment which requires dedication and offers them the chance for great artistic growth.

Studio Incamminati – Contemporary Realist Art

  • Instructor: Robin Frey, Jarred Fisher
  • Grade Level: 9-12
  • Requirement Information: Fills Upper School Fine/Performing Arts Requirement
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Pre-Requisites: None
  • Major/Minor Designation: Major

The purpose of this course is to teach the classical principles of life drawing and painting as they are taught at Studio Incamminati. In this highly acclaimed atelier, founded by Nelson Shanks, students are taught to observe both complex objects as well as the human form and draw them in a simple, strong way. Students at Doane will learn how to turn an object in a drawing by understanding how light affects the rotating form. By understanding elements such as terminators as well as the unique aspects of both the light and the shaded sides of the form, students will learn to bring their drawings to life. Perspective, composition, size and value relationships, creativity and aesthetic beauty will all be taught. Additionally, there will be a strong focus on learning and understanding anatomy. All of the major bones and muscles of the human body will be taught in dynamic lessons using anatomy books and a full-size skeleton. This information will then be applied both by using a live model and through the profound experience of creating a self-portrait. Here we will create with a true understanding of the physical while searching for personal emotional subtleties. Mid-year will bring the addition of oil painting to the course. Students will learn technical understanding as well as safe handling practices of this traditional medium. By creating color panels for each of the colors on our palette, students will gain confidence in color mixing while collectively making over 1000 hand-mixed colors. The exciting and insightful understanding of how light and the environment affect color will be explained, forever changing how each student perceives color. We have a dynamic year planned to give every student the precious opportunity learn and feel like an artist.

We truly hope that students will embrace the uniqueness of this class. We fully realize that our students might not feel as though they are good artists. It cannot be emphasized enough how everyone can benefit from this experience in learning to “see” at a whole new level. We are full time working painters who are excited to share a lifetime of hard earned knowledge. Our goal is to make this a fun and dynamic experience in which we help each student be the best artist they can be.

Upper School Choir

  • Instructor: Shelley Zuckerman
  • Grade Level: 7-12
  • Requirement Information: Fulfills required Fine/Performing Arts credit when taken in high school as a Major option. Fulfills .5 of 1 required Fine/Performing Arts credit when taken in high school as a Minor option.
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Major/Minor Designation: This course can be selected as either a Major and/or a Minor Arts option.
  • Honors Option: N/A

In this course, students learn proper vocal technique, basic music theory and sight-singing, choral repertoire, and some music history. In Choir, students prepare music for performance at two annual concerts, Chapel services, the Burlington County Teen Arts Festival, and other venues.

College Counseling

College and Career Prep 11

  • Instructor: TBA
  • Grade Level:11
  • Requirement Information: Fills 1 of 3 required 11th Grade Cycle courses
  • Duration: Trimester
  • Pre-Requisites: None
  • Honors Option: No

This mandatory course for an 11th-grade students is geared towards preparing students to excel in the college application process and meet the challenges of college life. In this course, students will:

Develop self-awareness of talents and relate them to career goals. Complete personality tests and career interest inventories as tools in their discovery and decision-making. Learn the college application process. Generate self-marketing materials such as application essays, resumés, and art or writing portfolios. Spend time with visiting college representatives Meet one-on-one with Dr. Yarwood to discuss their college goals

College and Career Prep 12

  • Instructor: TBA
  • Grade Level:12
  • Requirement Information: Fills 1 of 3 required 11th Grade Cycle courses
  • Duration: Trimester
  • Pre-Requisites: None
  • Honors Option: No

This mandatory course for a 12th-grade students is geared towards preparing students to excel in the college application process and meet the challenges of college life. In this course, students will develop self-awareness of talents and relate them to career goals; complete personality tests and career interest inventories as tools in their discovery and decision-making; learn the college application process; generate self-marketing materials such as application essays, resumés, and art or writing portfolios; spend time with visiting college representative; meet one-on-one with Meghan Toomey to discuss their college goals.

SAT Prep

  • Instructor: Tim Sadar, TBD
  • Grade Level:11
  • Requirement Information: Fills 1 of 3 required 11th Grade Cycle courses
  • Duration: Trimester
  • Pre-Requisites: None
  • Honors Option: No

This course, which is part of the 11th-grade cycle, focuses on preparation for both the ACT and the new SAT. It is graded as pass/fail. Every student has a different target score for their standardized tests, and each feels immense pressure to achieve that score, which itself functions as a “final grade.” By making the course pass/fail, we hope to avoid contributing to this pressure and to help students focus their entire energies on growing and improving each week. In the course, each student will spend half of the trimester focused on the math/science components of these standardized tests and half the trimester focused on the verbal and reading components.

Reading and Writing: The redesigned SAT consists of a Reading Test, Writing and Language Test, and optional essay. In SAT Prep, students will take a practice test and learn new test-taking strategies for attacking the new evidence-based reading and writing items.

Math: In addition, students will work on skill development exercises designed to increase the speed and accuracy of their answers. The course will review right triangles with techniques that will enable students to determine the lengths of the sides by either using Pythagorean Triples, right triangle trigonometry, or the special relationships in Isosceles Right Triangles and 30-60-90 triangles. Students will also be instructed on using the graphing calculator to solve equations. Finally, students will work on specific test taking techniques that will enable them to determine the correct answer for the multiple choice problems in which the answer choices are all numbers or all contain variables.

US Cycle

In grades 7 through 9, students work to develop “personal character” skills. They learn to express themselves creatively and in written form. They build the personal organization, inquiry, and design skills necessary for becoming reliable, trustworthy, and productive individuals. They develop an understanding of what it means to live a healthy lifestyle and begin to explore the complexity of trying to live ethically in an ever-changing world.

Starting their 10th grade year, students explore who they are as individuals, including what they value and how they view the world around them. They become comfortable sharing who they are with others and learn to exhibit empathy by exploring different social, religious, and ethical philosophies. They also explore the qualities of effective leaders in preparation for assuming leadership roles in both the Doane community and their own communities.

As they transition through 11th and into 12th grade, students will be challenged to share what they have learned about themselves, others, and leadership by taking the initiative to improve their world through projects related to their passions. They will be tasked with taking important, meaningful action in their communities and with being unafraid of standing firm for causes they believe in. They will strive to form lasting connections with those communities, thereby committing themselves and Doane Academy to continually working together in an effort to provide true community service with lasting impact.

Character, leadership, and personal growth best occurs in environments where such growth is the expectation. Doane Academy’s “Strong Ethical Leadership” academic cycles create a nurturing environment in which all our students may grow as individuals, positive community members, and effective leaders. By the time they graduate from Doane, students will know themselves, know the world, and be able to change both.

Leadership Foundations I

  • Instructor: Christina Butchko
  • Grade Level: 7
  • Duration: Trimester
  • Pre-Requisites: None
  • Alternate Course/s: Middle School STEAM Cycle

In this course, students will work to develop the core study skills necessary to lead themselves in school and beyond. They will focus on honing their abilities with personal organization, interpersonal communication skills, academic preparation, and self-advocacy. Class discussions and activities will foster self-awareness and self-reflection as well as engage students as they become more autonomous in their efforts to balance their workload and the demands of life as a teenager and an Upper School student at Doane.

Digital Media and Programming Complete

  • Instructor: TBD
  • Grade Level: 7th and 8th
  • Requirement Information: Fills 1 of 3 required 7th and 8th Grade cycle courses
  • Duration: Trimester
  • Pre-Requisites: N/A
  • Alternate Course/s: Middle School STEAM Cycle

Digital Media and Programming Complete is a trimester-long course in which students will explore contemporary topics involving digital media and ethics by creating interactive multimedia presentations and debates that incorporate podcast, vlogs, 3D modelling, and various research and presentation tools. They will also develop fundamental programming and 3D modelling skills by assembling LEGO EV3 robots that can navigate complex, multi-faceted obstacle courses. Lastly, as a part of Doane’s Strong Ethical Leadership program, students will explore what it means to be a “digital citizen” with a “digital footprint” created through their use of smart devices, social media, and more. At the end of the course, students may choose to “master” one of the three content areas - Digital Media, Digital Ethics, or Programming - and pursue a final project in that chosen field.

Middle School Drama: Adventures in Theater

  • Instructor: Ginger L. Agnew
  • Grade Level: 7-8
  • Duration: Trimester
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Alternate Courses: Middle School STEAM Cycle

This course is part of both the 7th and 8th-grade cycles. Please note that students who choose to take the Middle School STEAM Cycle have the option of taking that course for two trimesters and then taking Middle School Drama during the third trimester.

Middle School Drama affords students the opportunity to enjoy an intense, imaginative experience as they explore the world of live theater performance. The course will enhance confidence, creativity, and imagination and improve memory, focus, and concentration. Through it, students will develop listening, problem-solving, and performance skills as they collaborate with their classmates in a safe and caring learning environment.

After learning the basics, students will dig deeper into the world of live stage performance by reading plays, working with partners to create scenes, and presenting monologues. Improvisation skills will also be a focus. The course will culminate with a final production.

Digital Media and Programming Complete

  • Instructor: TBD
  • Grade Level: 7th and 8th
  • Requirement Information: Fills 1 of 3 required 7th and 8th Grade cycle courses
  • Duration: Trimester
  • Pre-Requisites: N/A
  • Alternate Course/s: Middle School STEAM Cycle

Digital Media and Programming Complete is a trimester-long course in which students will explore contemporary topics involving digital media and ethics by creating interactive multimedia presentations and debates that incorporate podcast, vlogs, 3D modelling, and various research and presentation tools. They will also develop fundamental programming and 3D modelling skills by assembling LEGO EV3 robots that can navigate complex, multi-faceted obstacle courses. Lastly, as a part of Doane’s Strong Ethical Leadership program, students will explore what it means to be a “digital citizen” with a “digital footprint” created through their use of smart devices, social media, and more. At the end of the course, students may choose to “master” one of the three content areas - Digital Media, Digital Ethics, or Programming - and pursue a final project in that chosen field.

Leadership Foundations II – Health and Fitness

  • Instructor:Kirk Lombardi
  • Grade Level:8
  • Duration: Trimester
  • Pre-Requisites: None
  • Alternate Course/s: Middle School STEAM Cycle

This one-trimester course meets three times a week for one trimester and follows a lecture and discussion format. The course objective is for students to learn more about their world and themselves. Topics of discussion include how to handle emotions and stress in daily life, understanding peer pressure, and the art of building good communication skills. Mental health problems, conflict management, violence prevention and how to say no are also covered. Classroom discussions and interactions between students and the teacher play a large role in this course. Students are encouraged to share their own personal experiences with the class. The course utilizes role playing to help students better understand how to deal with some problems. Students are graded on weekly quizzes, chapter tests, classroom work and participation.

Middle School Drama: Adventures in Theater

  • Instructor: Ginger L. Agnew
  • Grade Level: 7-8
  • Duration: Trimester
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Alternate Courses: Middle School STEAM Cycle

This course is part of both the 7th and 8th grade cycles. Please note that students who choose to take the Middle School STEAM Cycle have the option of taking that course for two trimesters and then taking Middle School Drama during the third trimester.

Middle School Drama affords students the opportunity to enjoy an intense, imaginative experience as they explore the world of live theater performance. The course will enhance confidence, creativity, and imagination and improve memory, focus, and concentration. Through it, students will develop listening, problem-solving, and performance skills as they collaborate with their classmates in a safe and caring learning environment.

After learning the basics, students will dig deeper into the world of live stage performance by reading plays, working with partners to create scenes, and presenting monologues. Improvisation skills will also be a focus. The course will culminate with a final production.

Ninth grade is an incredibly dynamic and important year in a child’s development into a “strong ethical leader” at Doane Academy. Students find themselves immersed in new social situations and presented with challenging coursework that helps them develop key real-world skills necessary for success as citizens in and leaders of their communities. One such critical skill is the ability to effectively communicate with others through written word.

As such, ninth graders enrolled at Doane take not one but two English courses, English 9 and Composition. In the former students focus on developing their critical thinking skills while also engaging fictional and nonfictional texts which challenge them to think globally about issues which have affected the various communities they participate in. The latter, which serves as the full-year cycle for ninth grade, provides students with a collegiate-style workshop environment in which they learn to express themselves in various genres of writing and to provide positive, constructive criticism to their peers.

At Doane, we believe our students cannot change the world if they cannot share their ideas with others. The ninth grade Composition cycle course affords our students with ample opportunities to hone that skill through their writing. Be it through opinion editorials, thesis-driven essays, poems, short stories, or simple emails, when students finish their ninth grade year they will be equipped to share their ideas with the world effectively and eloquently.

Composition

  • Instructor: TBD
  • Grade Level:9
  • Requirement Information: Fills 1 of 5 required Upper School English credits
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Pre-Requisites: N/A
  • Alternate Course/s: N/A

Echoing the emphasis on critical thinking of English 9, Composition instills, exercises, and polishes students’ writing abilities. Students are constantly at work on specific genres of writing. As a class, we workshop students’ drafts, developing the real world skills of constructive criticism and effective communication. Students experience a great deal of one-on-one conferencing with the instructor and small group workshops as well to better engage and polish their writing skills. Students complete units on cover letters and resumes, thesis-driven essays, expository writing, research papers, poetry portfolios, memoir writing, and independent creative writing. Examples of assignments include poetry/songwriting, college essay, research papers, persuasive writing, opinion pieces, and further polishing/elaborating on a previously written piece of writing.

Strong Ethical Leadership Intro

The world is an inescapably big place. It is often easy for us to get swept up in our own personal struggles and lose sight of the social, economic, and scientific “big picture” issues faced by society on a global scale. How do we educate ourselves? How do we collaborate with others, particularly those who disagree with us, to become more informed people and better contributors to our community? As an individual, how do I define leadership? How do I push myself to become the type of person I want to be? What skills do I need to develop? How are my personal relationships a reflection of who I am? How are they affecting who I am? These are difficult questions to ask ourselves, and ones that are even harder to answer. This series of courses tries to help students answer these questions and recognize that a commitment to understanding others is the foundation of meaningful leadership.

Strong Ethical Leadership I

  • Instructor: Katherine Sereduk
  • Grade Level: 10
  • Requirement Information: Fills 1 of 3 required 10th Grade Cycle courses
  • Duration: Trimester
  • Pre-Requisites: None
  • Honors Option: No

Strong Ethical Leadership II

  • Instructor: Katherine Sereduk
  • Grade Level: 10
  • Requirement Information: Fills 1 of 3 required 10th Grade Cycle courses
  • Duration: Trimester
  • Pre-Requisites: None
  • Honors Option: No

In this trimester-long course, a part of the 10th-grade cycle, students will examine the profiles of leaders from across history in search of the common characteristics and traits shared between them. They will discuss what made these leadership figures unique, engaging the various situations which led these individuals to become figureheads and recognizing that “leadership” can take many forms. Students will study Elon Musk and Kenneth Feinberg as well as other unconventional, modern, and lesser known leaders. “Solutions studies” figure prominently in this class as students investigate the innovations, compromises, and movements that the leaders created. The students will be challenged to relate what they have learned about effective leadership to their roles as class presidents, team captains, club executive board members, and role models for Lower School students.

World Religions

  • Instructor: Chaplain Paul Briggs
  • Grade Level:10
  • Requirement Information: Fills 1 of 3 required trimester courses
  • Duration: Trimester
  • Pre-Requisites: None
  • Honors Option:No

Religion profoundly shapes human culture. In this course, we will examine the beliefs and practices of the major religions of the world, focusing primarily on the “People of the Book” (Judaism, Christianity, and Islam) and religions of the Eastern World (Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, and Shintoism). We will consider briefly some of the most recent research about those with no religious affiliation and the ramifications of this research for world religions in the future. A basic understanding and appreciation of religions of the world is urgently needed today in building strong ethical leaders in an age of global interaction and in our multicultural society.

Strong Ethical Leadership III

  • Instructor: Katherine Sereduk
  • Grade Level: 11
  • Requirement Information: Fills 1 of 3 required 11th Grade Cycle courses
  • Duration: Trimester
  • Pre-Requisites: None
  • Honors Option: No

Students will explore complex issues from multiple perspectives, learn to review their own thoughts and experiences, seeking to better understand themselves. They will engage in productive discourse and learn to understand and grapple with a range of opinions. They will actively participate in a discussion over contemporary social issues faced by today’s world, looking to discover what challenges exist, what has been done so far to address the issue, what they truly care about and how their unique skill sets can be used to affect change. Social issues discussed in previous classes include mass incarceration, college tuition and education for girls. Issue analysis is evidence based, and student grades will be based on synthesis and incorporation of this evidence in support of their opinion. They will engage in role plays, class discussions, personal journals and analyzes of current and historical events. Students will be introduced to basic social science concepts to understand how scientists have tried to objectively define the nature of interpersonal human behaviors.

SAT Prep

  • Instructor:Tim Sadar, TBD
  • Grade Level: 11
  • Requirement Information: Fills 1 of 3 required 11th Grade Cycle courses
  • Duration: Trimester
  • Pre-Requisites: None
  • Honors Option: No

This course, which is part of the 11th-grade cycle, focuses on preparation for both the ACT and the new SAT. It is graded as pass/fail. Every student has a different target score for their standardized tests, and each feels immense pressure to achieve that score, which itself functions as a “final grade.” By making the course pass/fail, we hope to avoid contributing to this pressure and to help students focus their entire energies on growing and improving each week. In the course, each student will spend half of the trimester focused on the math/science components of these standardized tests and half the trimester focused on the verbal and reading components.

Reading and Writing: The redesigned SAT consists of a Reading Test, Writing and Language Test, and an optional essay. In SAT Prep, students will take a practice test and learn new test-taking strategies for attacking the new evidence-based reading and writing items.

Math: In addition, students will work on skill development exercises designed to increase the speed and accuracy of their answers. The course will review right triangles with techniques that will enable students to determine the lengths of the sides by either using Pythagorean Triples, right triangle trigonometry, or the special relationships in Isosceles Right Triangles and 30-60-90 triangles. Students will also be instructed on using the graphing calculator to solve equations. Finally, students will work on specific test taking techniques that will enable them to determine the correct answer for the multiple choice problems in which the answer choices are all numbers or all contain variables.

College and Career Prep 11

  • Instructor: Meghan Toomey
  • Grade Level: 11
  • Requirement Information: Fills 1 of 3 required 11th Grade Cycle courses
  • Duration: Trimester
  • Pre-Requisites: None
  • Honors Option:No

This mandatory course for all 11th-grade students is geared towards preparing students to excel in the college application process and meet the challenges of college life. In this course, students will develop self-awareness of talents and relate them to career goals; complete personality tests and career interest inventories as tools in their discovery and decision-making; learn the college application process; generate self-marketing materials such as application essays, resumés, and art or writing portfolios; spend time with visiting college representatives; meet one-on-one with Meghan Toomey to discuss their college goals.

College and Career Prep 12

  • Instructor: Meghan Toomey
  • Grade Level: 12
  • Requirement Information: Fills 1 of 3 required 11th Grade Cycle courses
  • Duration: Trimester
  • Pre-Requisites: None
  • Honors Option: No

This mandatory course for all 12th-grade students is geared towards preparing students to excel in the college application process and meet the challenges of college life. In this course, students will develop self-awareness of talents and relate them to career goals; complete personality tests and career interest inventories as tools in their discovery and decision-making; learn the college application process; generate self-marketing materials such as application essays, resumés, and art or writing portfolios; spend time with visiting college representatives; meet one-on-one with Meghan Toomey to discuss their college goals.

Strong Ethical Leadership IV

  • Instructor: Katherine Sereduk
  • Grade Level: 12
  • Requirement Information: Fills 2 of 3 required 12th Grade Cycle courses
  • Duration: Two Trimesters
  • Pre-Requisites: None
  • Honors Option: No

This trimester course builds off of previous Strong Ethical Leadership courses by tasking students with demonstrating true leadership in their local and Doane communities. Students will first build upon their foundations of research in the previous cycles and choose a cause about which they are passionate. The first portion of the course is devoted to research methodology including an introduction to qualitative and quantitative research. Students will analyze scholarly literature, case studies, primary data and basic statistics. They will then apply that knowledge to research their chosen issue. They will develop a plan of action with the intent of creating meaningful, positive change for their chosen community. Past senior projects include a middle and high school workshop series, designing and creating a naturescape for Doane’s primary classrooms, and collaboration with a local community garden to promote healthy recipes using garden produce. At the end of the course, students will be tasked with sharing the results of their efforts with administration and underclassmen in an effort to encourage lasting commitments and positive impact in communities through continually-improved efforts over multiple years.

Middle School STEAM Cycle

  • Instructor:Michael Russell
  • Grade Level:7-8
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Pre-Requisites: Digital Media and Programming I or Equivalent
  • Alternate Course/s: Cycle 7 (Leadership Foundations I/MS Art/Digital Media and Programming I); Cycle 8 (Leadership Foundations II/ MS Art/Digital Media and Programming II)

This full-year alternative to the 7th and 8th-grade cycles is the introductory Upper School S.T.E.A.M. course at Doane. In pursuit of developing the critical thinking and study skills necessary for success in High School and beyond, students will be introduced to the engineering design process and work collaboratively on nationally organized projects with the intent of competing against other schools in the region. As such, students will be expected to attend regular after school practices and all competition dates as a part of their course requirements. Past projects include the National Engineers Week Future City competition, First LEGO League robotics competition, The $500 Home Project, and the National STEM Video Game Challenge. Due to the changing nature of each year’s challenges, students may take this course in both their 7th and 8th-grade years.

This trimester-long course is a part of the required 10th-grade cycle which also includes World Religions and Strong Ethical Leadership II. In this class, students will explore the field of Sustainability. They will analyze the interaction between ethical, economic, and scientific concerns in developing sustainable practices personally, locally, nationally and abroad. Students will be tasked with developing practical and pragmatic solutions to real-world issues involving social equity, climate change, product development, population growth, and more. An emphasis is placed on community applications, and students are encouraged to think creatively about how they can transform their assignments into successful action plans for themselves, the Doane community and the global community.


US English

Upper School English students learn to be strong communicators and deep thinkers, with a particular focus on the development of writing skills. Through the study of important works of literature, students hone their analysis skills and learn to communicate their thoughts effectively. We hone writing skills in particular by assigning several multi-draft essays each trimester and involving students in writing workshops throughout the year. Doane Academy’s English department stands apart in that students need five English courses in order to graduate from our program. Our ninth grade program includes two courses, one of which focuses exclusively on research and composition skills.

Our small classes and emphasis on seminar style discussion allow students and teachers to build strong relationships and help every student make their voice heard. We supplement this development through our yearly Poetry Out Loud competition, which allows us to see and celebrate the growth of our students’ oral communication skills. The curriculum, rooted in canonical texts, requires students to grapple with issues of character and essential questions about the human experience. Ultimately, when students look back on their English education at Doane, they will remember an experience in which they confronted life’s most difficult questions and gained the confidence to answer them.

American Literature

  • Instructor: TBD
  • Grade Level: 11
  • Requirement Information: Fills 1 of 5 required Upper School English credits
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Pre-Requisites: None
  • Alternate Course/s: AP English Language & Composition
  • Honors: Yes

This course provides an introduction to the study of American literature. By studying texts from the nation’s founding to the present day, students will discover how our greatest authors have sought to define the identity of this country and explored its potential and its shortcomings. Students will regularly write analytical and personal essays that address the concepts discussed in class. Texts include Nathanial Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter, Mark Twain’s The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, and F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby.

Honors Requirements:

The honors students in American Literature read one book on their own. The book for 2014-2015 is Eugene O’Neill’s play Long Day’s Journey into Night. Honors students are required to complete regular reading quizzes (on their own time) for the play and also attend one mandatory discussion during advisory in May.

British Literature

  • Instructor: Paul Howe
  • Grade Level: 10
  • Requirement Information: Fills 1 of 5 required Upper School English credits
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Pre-Requisites: None
  • Honors: Yes

This class aims to broaden students’ cultural base through the study of classic works of British literature ranging from its earliest known examples to the dawn of the 20th century. By the conclusion of the course, students will have a better understanding of how the character archetypes and arcs created by writers like Chaucer and Shakespeare continue to drive and animate narratives today. Students will engage in effective literary analysis and refine their written and oral communication skills. Focal points will include the definition and testing of heroism and the power of language to describe and define both nature and culture. As they move into 11th grade, students will have the confidence to express their opinions in a clear, concise manner and support them with the balance of evidence and analysis that is required to make them powerful. Students will stretch their imaginations in creative writing assignments in which they imitate the style of great authors. They will also have a firm grasp on how to integrate the opinions and research of others into their essays and make the appropriate citations.

Honors Requirements:

Honors students will read additional texts independently and craft insightful analysis which they will share with their classmates in both written and oral forms.

English 9

  • Instructor:TBD
  • Grade Level: 9
  • Requirement Information: Fills 1 of 5 required Upper School English credits
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Pre-Requisites: None
  • Honors: Yes

In English 9, students will build a community of critical readers, writers, and thinkers in conversation with great literature. As a community, they will explore big-picture literary and ethical questions: What are our expectations for certain kinds of literature, and what happens when artists break those “rules”? How does literature illuminate conflict in cultural and generational identities? How can engaging literature help us build empathy? To anchor discussions of these larger questions, students will practice close reading of specific textual details. This kind of sustained analysis will allow students to develop and support their ideas, both in seminar-style discussions and in written work. Texts are drawn from across genres, cultures, and time periods: The reading list includes Shakespearean drama, lyric poetry from the trenches of WWI, a collection of Hemingway’s short stories, a graphic novel about growing up in revolutionary Iran, and the 2015 Pulitzer prize-winning novel. Central themes that tie these diverse texts together are war and personal conflict as they shape the process of growing up.

Honors Requirements: Honors students will further engage the texts and their classmates’ ideas via additional journal assignments, formal peer critiques of written work, and class leadership exercises.

World Literature

  • Instructor: Jordan Bennett
  • Grade Level:12
  • Requirement Information: Fills 1 of 5 required Upper School English credits
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Pre-Requisites: None
  • Alternate Course/s: AP English Literature & Composition
  • Honors: No

This class aims to expose students to a range of times, places, and cultures in a way that causes them to more closely examine and better understand themselves. Students will read texts that allow them to travel the world and consider the most complex questions about the human experience. What is our relationship to a higher power and how much control do we have over our destinies? How do we distinguish our true selves from the projections we create? How do we recognize and combat evil in all its forms? These questions will help students study the subtle differences between peoples but also search for the commonalities that bind them together. Each additional work will expand the circumference of students’ empathy to include more people and additional perspectives. World Literature will encourage and require students to engage in effective literary analysis and marry that analysis to nuanced thesis statements that are as complex as the questions they answer. By the conclusion of the course, students will have the confidence to express their opinions at a college level both in terms of their quality and clarity. Primary texts include Oedipus Rex, The Book of Job, Hamlet, Heart of Darkness, and Imagining Argentina.

AP English Language & Composition

  • Instructor:TBD
  • Grade Level:11
  • Requirement Information: Fills 1 of 5 required Upper School English credits
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Pre-Requisites: None
  • Alternate Course/s: American Literature (Regular or Honors)

This course may be taken in place of 11th Grade American Literature. It has a college–level curriculum designed to prepare students for the Advanced Placement test offered in May. In addition to satisfying a high school graduation requirement, the AP Language and Composition class may be taken for college credit, which can be earned by scoring highly on the AP test or through an arrangement with Rowan College at Burlington County. The course seeks to train students to read, analyze, and compose in a variety of expository modes and purposes. It is primarily a study of rhetoric and the myriad strategies authors use in approaching their audiences. The course is driven by the study of complex, non-fiction writing and will prepare students to accomplish the kind of college-level writing their future professors are expecting. Students will read and analyze selections from a set of “50 Essays” selected by the College Board, be exposed to long-form journalism, and experience book-length non-fiction like Jon Krakauer’s Into the Wild.

In addition, this course aims to engage students with American Literature, as they will establish a cultural knowledge base by reading classic American texts. Students can expect to emerge from this class both prepared for the AP exam and familiar with Puritan literature, American Romantic and Transcendental ideas, The Scarlet Letter, Huckleberry Finn, The Great Gatsby, and more.

AP Literature and Composition

  • Instructor: TBD
  • Grade Level: 12
  • Requirement Information: Fills 1 of 5 required Upper School English credits
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Pre-Requisites: None
  • Alternate Course/s: World Literature

This course may be taken in place of 12th Grade World Literature. Students can earn college credit through an arrangement with Rowan College at Burlington County or by taking the AP Literature exam in May. In AP Literature, students read and respond to works of “acknowledged literary merit” as a way of engaging what William Faulkner called “the old verities and truths of the heart…love and honor and pity and pride and compassion and sacrifice.” Students will continue to learn the technical terminology of literary criticism and will apply it to a variety of genres, including lyric poetry, fiction, and drama. Students will sharpen the skills of citing evidence to shape and support an analysis of a literary text. The aim of the course is threefold: to prepare for the AP exam, to prepare for college humanities courses, and to build a foundation for a lifelong love of reading.

Composition

  • Instructor:TBD
  • Grade Level: 9
  • Requirement Information: Fills 1 of 5 required Upper School English credits; Fills 9th Grade cycle requirement
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Pre-Requisites: None
  • Honors: No

As students practice close reading and literary analysis in English 9, they will build complementary writing skills in Composition. Students will learn to structure, support, and revise a critical argument; apply key concepts in grammar and style; perform strategic research and cite others’ work appropriately; and communicate their ideas effectively as critical, reflective, and creative writers. Assignments will include analytical essays, a persuasive speech, a cover letter and résumé, a personal memoir, a blog, and a variety of creative pieces. The course culminates in a research project in which students will explore the challenges, advantages, and cultural assumptions that define their generation. As they build a supportive, constructive community of writers, students will discover that the best way to improve as a writer is to give and receive feedback. In addition to frequent peer-sharing exercises, every student will have the benefit of one full-class writing workshop at the drafting stage of a major assignment. At the conclusion of the course, students will possess the foundational skills and the confidence required to be successful high school writers.

English 7

  • Instructor:TBD
  • Grade Level: 7
  • Requirement Information:
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Pre-Requisites: N/A
  • Alternate Course/s: N/A

This course builds foundations for success in high school classes through an emphasis on grammar, vocabulary, and writing skills. Strong reading skills are essential for academic success, and English 7 introduces students to strategies to aid reading comprehension. The literary readings revolve around themes such as the imagination and the development of identity. Creative writing, presentations, and group projects provide a variety of ways for students to learn and be assessed. Texts include Jack Schaeffer’s Shane, Norton Juster’s The Phantom Tolbooth, and Edith Hamilton’s Mythology.

English 8

  • Instructor:TBD
  • Grade Level: 8
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Pre-Requisites: None

This course builds foundations for success in high school through an emphasis on analytical reading and writing. Students become familiar with texts like The Odyssey which form the foundation of Western Literature as well as the components of a strong, modern-day narrative. Students learn to develop opinions (or claims) about a piece of writing and support those claims with textual evidence. In addition, students learn and practice the fundamentals of personal narrative and analytic writing. By emphasizing the writing process, students learn how to approach large writing projects successfully. Note taking skill, close reading of difficult text, and poetic terminology are points of emphasis. Eighth graders also begin, through coordinated practice, to develop the conversational and argumentative skills necessary to analyze literature in both group and individualized settings. A wide range of World and American Literature is offered, providing a solid base for further high school studies. The texts include various short stories, poems, Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird, Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, and Lorraine Hansberry’s A Raisin in the Sun.

US Health

Full-Year Requirement- Credited within the PE Course, this course meets once every six days and follows a lecture and discussion format. The course objective is to provide students with more than health information but to help them to start thinking on their own and to learn to make “wise” choices concerning health issues. Students are taught the impact that these choices will have on their lifetime health. Classroom discussions and interaction between students and teacher play a large role in this course. The following topics are covered: Planning for a healthy life style, Learning the ways to manage stress and deal with conflict, and The body systems and how they work. Students are graded on weekly quizzes, chapter tests, classroom work and participation.

Text: Mary Merki, Teen Health

Full-Year Requirement- Credited within the PE course, this course meets once every six days and follows a lecture and discussion format. The course objective is for students to learn more about their world and themselves. Topics of discussions focus on information students will need to deal with in their teen years. Such topics include: how to handle emotions and stress in their daily lives, understanding peer pressure and the art of building good communication skills are our top priorities. Also covered are mental health problems, conflict management, violence prevention and how to say no to drugs. Classroom discussions and interaction between students and teacher play a large role in this course. Students are encouraged to share their own personal experiences with the class. The course utilizes role playing to understand better how to deal with some problems. Students are graded on weekly quizzes, chapter tests, classroom work and participation

Text: Mary Merki, Teen Health


US History

Ancient World History

  • Instructor: Colleen McCormick
  • Grade Level: 8th
  • Requirement Information: Required for all eighth graders
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Pre-Requisites: N/A
  • Alternate Course/s: N/A

This course will focus on major events and concepts in world history beginning with the first civilizations and continuing into the Italian Renaissance. This course provides the foundations for Modern World History, which Doane Academy students take in ninth grade. During this course, students will learn how to write a historical research paper.

AP European History

  • Instructor: Colleen McCormick
  • Grade Level: 10-12th
  • Requirement Information: Fills 1 of 3 required Upper School History/Social Studies credits
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Pre-Requisites: N/A
  • Alternate Course/s: N/A

This course is offered during alternating years and will not be offered in 2016-2017

Students in this course are expected to demonstrate knowledge of major events and trends as well as basic chronology in European history from the High Renaissance (1450) to the present. This course will focus on intellectual, cultural, political, social, economic, and diplomatic developments throughout European history through the use of the text as well as primary sources such as documents, maps, statistics, artwork, and other pictorial/graphic evidence. Students will develop the ability to analyze historical evidence and the ability to express their analysis and understanding effectively in writing. This course is taken in preparation for the AP exam in May. Also, this class may be taken for college credit through the Rowan College at Burlington County CAP Program.

Advanced Placement Psychology

  • Instructor: James Paradis
  • Grade Level: 10-12
  • Requirement Information: Fills 1 of 3 required Upper School History/Social Studies credits
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Pre-Requisites: N/A
  • Alternate Course/s: Sociology, AP Government, AP European History

This full-year elective course begins with an overview of the history, goals, methods and careers of the profession of psychology. Later modules examine the biological foundations of behavior, sensation and perception, sleep, dreams, hypnosis, learning, memory, motivation, emotion, developmental psychology, personality theory, psychopathology, psychotherapy, social psychology, and intelligence. The text for the course is Rod Plotnik’s Introduction to Psychology, published by Thompson / Wadsworth. This course may be taken for college credit either through successfully completion of the AP Test or through an arrangement with Rowan College at Burlington County.

AP U. S. History

  • Instructor: Mary Ann Williamson
  • Grade Level: 10
  • Requirement Information: Fills 1 of 3 required Upper School History/Social Studies credits
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Pre-Requisites: Permission of instructor

AP US History is a course for rising 10th graders that begins with New World Beginnings and goes to present day. This course is designed to challenge and help make better analytical thinkers. Students will be required to do reading assignments as well as terms for each unit. A key to success is to do the textbook readings the weekend before a given unit begins. Reading prior to the week’s activities will help you understand class activities and prepare you for the Free Response Questions, Document Based Questions and Multiple Choice tests that are at the end of every unit. This course and the previous course are built to prepare students for the AP exam. Also, this class may be taken for college credit through the Rowan College at Burlington County CAP Program. Over the course of the year, this course will help students develop competence and autonomy.

Honors Requirements: Since this is an AP course, there is no Honors option offered.

AP US History II

  • Instructor: Mary Ann Williamson
  • Grade Level: 11
  • Requirement Information: Fills 1 of 3 required Upper School History/Social Studies credits
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Pre-Requisites: Pre-AP US History I or instructor approval from US History I

Course Description: AP US History II is the continuation of Pre-AP US History I and is only for students who have completed this course. AP US History II begins with the Gilded Age and covers the year 2000. This course is designed to challenge and help make better analytical thinkers. Students will be required to do reading assignments as well as terms for each unit. A key to success is to do the textbook readings the weekend before a given unit begins. Reading prior to the week’s activities will help you understand class activities and prepare you for the Free Response Questions, Document Based Questions and Multiple Choice tests that are at the end of every unit. This course and the previous course are built to prepare students for the AP exam. Also, this class may be taken for college credit through the Rowan College at Burlington County CAP Program. Over the course of the year, this course will help students develop competence and autonomy.

Honors Requirements: Since this is an AP course, there is no Honors option offered.

Civil War, Reconstruction, and African-American History

  • Instructor: James Paradis
  • Grade Level: 10-12
  • Requirement Information: Fills 1 of 3 required Upper School History/Social Studies credits
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Pre-Requisites: N/A

This year-long course is an in-depth study of African American history as well as the Civil War and Reconstruction. By reading the text and through lectures, slides, and films, students will gain deep insight in the African-American experience and the crucial era before, during, and after the Civil War.

Fundamentals of Street Law, Economics, and Personal Financial

  • Instructor: Colleen McCormick
  • Grade Level: 9-12
  • Requirement Information: Fills 1 of 3 required Upper School History/Social Studies credits
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Pre-Requisites: N/A
  • Alternate Course/s: N/A

This course is designed to provide you with an understanding of your legal rights and responsibilities, a knowledge of everyday legal problems, and the ability to analyze, evaluate, and in some situations, resolve legal disputes. It will also address general problems in the areas of criminal and juvenile justice; torts; and consumer, family, and individual rights law. Students will become more aware of what to do about discrimination or other violations of their constitutional rights.

Students will also begin an exploration of the world of economics and cover the concepts of personal finance. They will explore the fundamental laws of micro- and macroeconomics, including the concepts of scarcity, opportunity cost, supply and demand, productivity and efficiency as they apply to individual and collective human behavior. The class will apply the concepts of budgeting, career planning, saving, and investing, banking and credit as students learn to make better financial goals and decisions to work towards their future using practical skills and examples. Course content will be applied in a variety of ways, including simulations such as the stock market game and the creation of a personal finance plan for college and beyond.

Modern World History

  • Instructor: Mary Ann Williamson
  • Grade Level: 9
  • Requirement Information: Fills 1 of 3 required Upper School History/Social Studies credits
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Pre-Requisites: N/A

Modern World History focuses on major events in world history from approximately the Renaissance to the present day in order to increase students’ knowledge of the society in which they live and help them achieve a solid understanding of how that society emerged over time. The course teaches students about people, ideas, places, lifestyles, and cultures that influenced the course of history. Though most of the curriculum focuses on issues that affected Europe, the course is not taught entirely from a Euro-centric perspective. Students will examine interactions between trading cultures and warring states from multiple perspectives using primary sources from outside the text, including diaries, memoirs, letters, and even newspaper archives. By the end of the year, 9th graders should see how wealth, power, creativity, spirituality, ingenuity, and other morally ambiguous forces have shaped our environment.

Honors Requirements: Offered

Sociology

  • Instructor: Mary Ann Williamson
  • Grade Level: 10-12th
  • Requirement Information: Fills 1 of 3 required Upper School History/Social Studies credits
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Pre-Requisites: N/A

This course teaches students about people, ideas, places, lifestyles, and cultures. We will look at how people interact with one another and why. The course is also designed to give students a broader view of the world that will help shape their attitudes and lives in a constructive way. Using the text as a resource, as well as the Internet, the library, newspapers, and videos, students will explore issues that affect our country today. This class may be taken for college credit through the Rowan College at Burlington County CAP Program.

U.S. History

  • Instructor: James Paradis
  • Grade Level: 10
  • Requirement Information: Fills 1 of 3 required Upper School History/Social Studies credits
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Pre-Requisites: N/A
  • Alternate Course/s: N/A

This is a required, one-credit survey course that is taken in 10th grade. The history of the United States is studied, primarily within a chronological framework, from early settlement through the present day. The text used is Paul Boyer’s The American Nation, Holt, Rinehart, and Winston.

Honors Requirements: Since there is an AP course option, there is no Honors option offered.

U. S. History II

  • Instructor: James Paradis
  • Grade Level: 11
  • Requirement Information: Fills 1 of 3 required Upper School History/Social Studies credits
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Pre-Requisites: US History I
  • Alternate Course/s: N/A

This is a required, one-credit survey course offered only to students who have already taken U.S. History I. The history of the United States in studied, primarily within a chronological context, from Reconstruction after the Civil War to the present. The course goals include helping students to appreciate the diversity of people who have contributed to the development of the country and increasing the critical thinking and analysis skills of students. The text utilized is Paul Boyer’s The American Nation, Holt, Rinehart, and Winston.

Honors Requirements: Since there is an AP course option, there is no Honors option offered

US Mathematics

The Mathematics department at Doane Academy is dedicated to the advancement of the mathematical reasoning skills critical for fostering quantitative and deductive thinking abilities in our students. We strive not just for competency with concepts necessary for effective citizenship, but also for recognition that mathematics is a vibrant field of study that can serve as a powerful and exciting tool in this ever-evolving world. We seek to develop students who are courageous in mathematics, unafraid to work collaboratively and take intelligent risks while developing their problem solving skills.

Our focus on problem-based learning and our small class sizes afford our students with a tremendous opportunity to tackle challenging, multidimensional problems with the help of their peers and their instructor. Those students looking for even greater challenges may take our advanced level Calculus courses, conduct a Statistics-based study for the annual S.T.E.A.M. Fair, and participate in monthly competitions with our Mathematics Club.

For many students, finding ‘x’ is the goal. At Doane, our goal is for students to know why they found ‘x,’ how they created the means for doing so, and under what circumstances ‘x’ could be altered to obtain a different result. As such, students graduating from Doane Academy leave with a deeper understanding of the nature of mathematics and are capable of constructing complex, logical arguments making use of mathematical modelling and quantitative data.

* Course titles accompanied with an asterisk indicate an Honors Option. Selection of an Honors Option means the student is electing to do additional, more challenging work, requiring a higher level of critical thinking. These students will receive credit for honors level work.

Algebra I

  • Instructor(s): Michael Fouchet
  • Grade Level: 7-9
  • Requirement Information: Fills 1 of 3 required High School Mathematics courses
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Pre-Requisites: Pre-Algebra
  • Alternate Courses: N/A

Algebra I is where students begin to build the conceptual knowledge base necessary for conquering complex problems using mathematical reasoning. Through collaborative work groups and heavy emphasis on the “how” and “why” of concepts, students will build a foundation of mathematical knowledge and problem solving techniques that will help them in future math classes and beyond. Content coverage will vary slightly depending on each student’s needs and prior knowledge but will contain core concepts such as solving complex equations and inequalities, linear functions, and systems of equations.

Honors Requirements:

Honors students are expected to delve deeper into the concepts mastered during class by completing weekly Honors-level homework assignments and tackling more difficult problems on graded assessments. In addition, Honors students will complete one project per trimester related to a topic covered during that trimester.

Algebra II

  • Instructor(s): Michael Fouchet
  • Grade Level: 9-11
  • Requirement Information: Fills 1 of 3 required High School Mathematics courses
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Pre-Requisites: Algebra I
  • Alternate Courses: N/A

Algebra 2 calls upon all of the previous material learned in Algebra 1 and Geometry in order to explore various functions and models: quadratics, exponentials, logarithms, radicals, matrices, and more. Students will be expected to apply learned concepts to both novel situations in a pure mathematical framework and real-life applications. Students will have the opportunity to work collaboratively and at their own pace, continuing to build the autonomous study skills necessary for success in collegiate level mathematics courses. By the end of this course, students will have completed the traditional sequence of high school mathematics classes and thus be prepared to pursue most upper-level Math and Science courses offered at Doane.

Honors Requirements:

Honors students are expected to delve deeper into the concepts mastered during class by completing weekly Honors-level homework assignments and tackling more difficult problems on graded assessments. In addition, Honors students will complete one project per trimester related to a topic covered during that trimester.

Geometry

  • Instructor(s): TBD
  • Grade Level: 8-10
  • Requirement Information: Fills 1 of 3 required High School Mathematics courses
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Pre-Requisites: Algebra I
  • Alternate Courses: N/A

Geometry students are challenged to examine the world around them and deconstruct it into the geometric structures that form the building blocks of their daily experience of “space.” Students will learn to apply mathematical logic when doing so, assembling logical progressions of facts that prove the fundamental theorems they will utilize throughout their explorations of triangles, polygons, congruence, similarity, trigonometry, circles, and polyhedra. Students will also build on the skills gained in Algebra I by analyzing geometric problem sets with algebraic concepts. As participants in a heavily visual course emphasizing the development of spatial reasoning skills, students can expect to be frequently challenged to apply their conceptual understanding of course material to a variety of topics, including art, science, architecture, and more.

Honors Requirements:

Honors students are expected to delve deeper into the concepts mastered during class by completing weekly Honors-level homework assignments and tackling more difficult problems on graded assessments. In addition, Honors students will complete one project per trimester related to a topic covered during that trimester.

Pre-Calculus

  • Instructor(s): Matthew Gorman
  • Grade Level: 10-12
  • Requirement Information: Fills 1 of 3 required High School Mathematics courses
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Pre-Requisites: Algebra II
  • Alternate Courses: Topics in Modern Mathematics

Pre-Calculus serves a dual purpose as a mathematics course. Firstly, it covers content not encountered in previous math courses at Doane, most notably trigonometry, vectors, and analytic geometry. Secondly, it introduces students to concepts in Calculus such as continuity, limits, and derivatives. This full-year elective expects mastery of content from previous mathematics courses. As such, students enrolling in this course should anticipate a vigorous and challenging exploration of topics that will pull from content mastered throughout their mathematics careers as students. Those students that rise up this challenge and complete Pre-calculus will be ready to take their first steps in Calculus in college or at Doane.

Honors Requirements:

Honors students are expected to delve deeper into the concepts mastered during class by completing weekly Honors-level homework assignments and tackling more difficult problems on graded assessments. In addition, Honors students will complete one project per trimester related to a topic covered during that trimester.

AP Calculus AB

  • Instructor(s): Michael Fouchet
  • Grade Level: 11-12
  • Requirement Information: Fills 1 of 3 required High School Mathematics courses
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Pre-Requisites: Pre-Calculus
  • Alternate Courses: AP Calculus BC, Topics in Modern Mathematics

AP Calculus BC

  • Instructor(s): Matthew Gorman
  • Grade Level: 11-12
  • Requirement Information: Fills 1 of 3 required High School Mathematics courses
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Pre-Requisites: Pre-Calculus Honors, Instructor’s Approval
  • Alternate Courses: AP Calculus AB, Topics in Modern Mathematics

AP Calculus BC builds upon the content mastered in high school mathematics courses and delves into topics which when summed together equate to two semesters of college level Calculus. Students will explore in-depth core Calculus concepts, including limits, derivatives, differentiation, and integrals. They will then further explore the derivative and integral by examining parametric, polar, and vector functions. They will also analyze polynomial approximations and series. Students enrolled in this course are expected to take the AP Calculus BC exam administered in May.

Honors Requirements:

All students enrolling in AP Calculus BC do so at the AP level. Thus, they are expected to demonstrate the motivation, work ethic, and initiative commensurate to the course workload.

Math 6

  • Instructor(s): TBD
  • Grade Level: 6
  • Requirement Information: N/A
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Pre-Requisites: N/A
  • Alternate Courses: N/A

Math 6 marks the start of a transition for students away from arithmetic manipulations and toward complex problem solving using algebraic techniques and algorithms. Students will begin the year exploring arithmetic operations, number properties, fractions, exponents, and variables through exploration activities, real-world applications, and interactive lessons. They will then begin their explorations of linear equations and expressions by solving equations, graphing on the coordinate plane, and interpreting statistical information visually and numerically. They will also apply these new skills to solving geometric problems involving area, surface area, and volume. By mastering these concepts, students in Math 6 will be ready to tackle the challenges of Pre-Algebra and beyond.

Honors Requirements: N/A

Math 7

  • Instructor(s): TBD
  • Grade Level: 7
  • Requirement Information: N/A
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Pre-Requisites: Math 6
  • Alternate Courses: Pre-Algebra* (*Placement based on Instructor’s recommendation)

Math 7 introduces topics that lay the groundwork for future algebraic studies as well as revisits topics seen in previous years of mathematics classes with more depth and sophistication. The course prepares students to start their formal study of Algebra, which begins with the Pre-Algebra course. It provides a rich opportunity for them to gain the confidence they need to develop a strong understanding and appreciation for the material that will be the basis of many of the future mathematics classes. Topics covered will depend on student need but may include positive and negative numbers, basic solving equations, number theory, rational numbers, inequalities, ratios and proportions, percents, and slope.

Honors Requirements: N/A

Pre-Algebra

  • Instructor(s): Christina Butchko
  • Grade Level: 7-8
  • Requirement Information: N/A
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Pre-Requisites: Math 6
  • Alternate Courses: Math 7* (*Placement based on Instructor’s recommendation)

Pre-Algebra bridges the gap between mathematics learned during the elementary school years and high school math courses. This course is designed to provide students with fundamental skills that will be needed throughout the rest of their mathematical career. Students will expand on their knowledge of number operations, exponents, ratios, percents, fractions, proportions, equations, and expressions. They will then tackle developing a core understanding of functions and inequalities - how to define them, evaluate them, and interpret their graphs - in preparation for success in Algebra I and beyond. Lastly, the class will explore some of the core geometric theorems that they will use to evaluate parallel and perpendicular lines, triangles, and graphical transformations.

Honors Requirements: N/A

Topics in Modern Mathematics

  • Instructor(s): Matthew Gorman
  • Grade Level: 11-12
  • Requirement Information: Fills 1 of 3 required High School Mathematics courses
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Pre-Requisites: Algebra II
  • Alternate Courses: Pre-Calculus, AP Calculus AB, AP Calculus BC

In this full-year mathematics elective, students will use new mathematical ideas as well as previously learned material to explore topics relevant to their present and future lives. Topics will include statistical modeling, interpreting and analyzing data, computing probabilities, and personal finance. Students will also study and model interesting problems from several topics that are not typically covered in a traditional mathematics course, such as analyzing the validity of logical arguments, finding the optimal path to build or travel upon, and the Apportionment Problem and its relation to the distribution of seats in a legislature.

Honors Requirements: N/A

Calculus is the foundation of modern mathematics and physics, and its concepts enable us to make sense of motion, forces, and a host of other phenomena. This course - the equivalent of one semester of college-level Calculus - provides an in-depth look at core Calculus concepts, including limits, derivatives, differentiation, and integrals, with an emphasis placed on “real world” problems involving optimization, related rates, and motion. The course curriculum is designed to develop a deep understanding of the theorems which are critical to success in advanced Calculus courses. Students enrolled in this course are expected to take the AP Calculus AB exam administered in May.

Honors Requirements:

All students enrolling in AP Calculus AB do so at the AP level. Thus, they are expected to demonstrate the motivation, work ethic, and initiative commensurate to the course workload.


US Physical Education

Full-Year Requirement- Physical Education is required in 7th and 8th grades only. The focus of this physical education program is to provide an opportunity for students to participate in a wide variety of physical activities and experiences that promote the mastery of the core skills introduced at the elementary school level. Middle School physical education will build a framework for lifetime activities and healthy living. Middle School is a time of transition, which may bring about an upheaval in physical, emotional, social, and intellectual worlds. To successfully bridge this transition, students will explore and apply information, as well as participate in activities that empower them to assume responsibility for their own lifetime health, wellness, and fitness.

Seasonal Requirement- At Doane Academy, we feel athletics plays an integral role in the development of our students, as sports are as much about character development as physical development. Our athletic programs embody the ideals of physical fitness, sportsmanship, teamwork, skill improvement and character development. The student athletes’ commitment to excellence and leadership provides a backdrop to maximize their academic and athletic potential. In order to fulfill the physical education graduation requirement, all students in 9th–12th grades must participate in at least one season of a school sport per school year. Students are expected to practice and attend games after school five days a week throughout the season of their sport. Doane Academy competes exclusively at the Varsity level in the Penn-Jersey NJSIAA Parochial B Athletic Association in the following sports:

Fall

  • Cross Country
  • Varsity Boys Soccer
  • Varsity Girls Soccer

Winter

  • Varsity Boys Basketball
  • Varsity Girls Basketball

Spring

  • Crew
  • Varsity Softball
  • Varsity Baseball

US Science

Doane Academy’s Science department seeks to engage students in the practice of doing science as a means of engaging scientific theory. Our inquiry-based approach to curriculum design challenges students to explore concepts through experimental design, projects, tinkering, data modelling, and more. We firmly believe that students learn best by “doing.” As such, we emphasize hands-on, real-world experiences which encourage our students to understand the nature of scientific inquiry and how it applies to their daily lives.

The department seeks to provide opportunities for students to participate in interdisciplinary lessons that encourage them to blend content from various subject areas in pursuit of their personal interests. Thus, students are taught through their lab experiences to include what they’ve learned in their other classes as a part of the scientific process. They will explore how scientific breakthroughs have changed the course of history, use concepts learned to inspire artistic representations, apply statistical methods to manipulate data, and take advantage of available technology to enhance their laboratory experience.

Between our robust selection of electives and our core laboratory science curriculum, students graduating from Doane Academy will have learned that true scientific inquiry is not about having the right answers, but instead about asking challenging questions which propel them toward new understandings about their surrounding world

* Course titles accompanied with an asterisk indicate an Honors Option. Selection of an Honors Option means the student is electing to do additional, more challenging work, requiring a higher level of critical thinking. These students will receive credit for honors level work.

Biology

  • Instructor(s): Hillary Rupert
  • Grade Level: 9
  • Requirement Information: Fills 1 of 3 required High School Laboratory Science courses
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Pre-Requisites: N/A
  • Alternate Courses: N/A

This full-year laboratory science course is traditionally taken during the 9th-grade year. The course explores the foundations of the biological sciences, including biochemistry, ecology, genetics, evolutionary biology, the major kingdoms and domains of life, and the human body. Additionally, students will gain exposure to how topics studied affect their daily lives through problem solving, projects, and explorations of modern developments in related fields. Lab work is an integral component of the course and will expose students to advanced core laboratory techniques and experimental procedures.

Honors Requirements:

Honors students are expected to delve deeper into the concepts mastered during class by completing weekly Honors-level homework assignments and tackling more difficult problems on graded assessments. In addition, Honors students will complete one project per trimester related to a topic covered during that trimester.

Chemistry

  • Instructor(s): Patrick Gibbons
  • Grade Level: 10
  • Requirement Information: Fills 1 of 3 required High School Laboratory Science courses
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Pre-Requisites: N/A
  • Alternate Courses: N/A

This full-year laboratory science course is traditionally taken during the 10th-grade year. The course explores the foundations of general chemistry, including atomic theory, stoichiometry, chemical reactions, properties of matter, organic chemistry, and nuclear energy. Additionally, students will gain exposure to how topics studied affect their daily lives through problem solving, projects, and explorations of modern developments in related fields. Lab work is an integral component of the course. When appropriate, students will be given agency over the structure and focus of labs and projects.

Honors Requirements:

Honors students are expected to delve deeper into the concepts mastered during class by completing weekly Honors-level homework assignments and tackling more difficult problems on graded assessments. In addition, Honors students will complete one project per trimester related to a topic covered during that trimester.

AP Biology

  • Instructor(s): Hillary Rupert
  • Grade Level: 11-12
  • Requirement Information: Fills 1 of 3 required High School Laboratory Science courses
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Pre-Requisites: Biology, Algebra II*, Instructor’s Approval (*recommended)
  • Alternate Courses: Physics, AP Chemistry, Research Topics in Biology, Research Topics in Chemistry

This course is offered on alternating years and will not be offered in 2016-2017

This full-year laboratory science elective is the equivalent of an introductory college course in Biology. Students will develop advanced inquiry and reasoning skills as they explore concepts mastered in Biology in further detail through analyzing data, applying mathematical routines, and connecting concepts across content domains. Students enrolled in this course are expected to take the AP Biology exam administered in May.

Honors Requirements:

All students enrolling in AP Biology do so at the AP level. Thus, they are expected to demonstrate the motivation, work ethic, and initiative commensurate to the course workload.

AP Chemistry

  • Instructor(s): Patrick Gibbons
  • Grade Level: 11-12
  • Requirement Information: Fills 1 of 3 required High School Laboratory Science courses
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Pre-Requisites: Chemistry, Algebra II*, Instructor’s Approval (*recommended)
  • Alternate Courses: Physics, AP Biology, Research Topics in Biology, Research Topics in Chemistry

This course is offered on alternating years and will be offered in 2016-2017

This full-year laboratory science elective is the equivalent of an introductory college course in Chemistry. A strong emphasis is placed on constructing models, real-world applications, and visual learning as students explore concepts mastered in General Chemistry in further detail. Students enrolled in this course are expected to take the AP Chemistry exam administered in May.

Honors Requirements:

All students enrolling in AP Chemistry do so at the AP level. Thus, they are expected to demonstrate the motivation, work ethic, and initiative commensurate to the course workload.

Earth Science 6

  • Instructor(s): Christina Butchko
  • Grade Level: 6
  • Requirement Information: N/A
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Pre-Requisites: N/A
  • Alternate Courses: N/A

The middle school Earth Science course provides students with an introduction to our planet and what is in it, on it, and above it. In this laboratory science course, students will explore land, sea, and air in pursuit of a better understanding of the planet we call home. Students will be afforded multiple hands-on opportunities to explore numerous topics in the Earth Science fields, including geology, seismology, topography, oceanography, and meteorology. Labs are frequent, and students are taught the importance of accuracy, clarity, and organization when completing an analysis of a lab. Time permitting, students will then “leave Earth” and explore the other planets of our solar system.

Honors Requirements: N/A

Life Science 7

  • Instructor(s): Hillary Rupert
  • Grade Level: 7
  • Requirement Information: N/A
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Pre-Requisites: N/A
  • Alternate Courses: N/A

Physical Science 8

  • Instructor(s): Colleen McCormick and Patrick Gibbons
  • Grade Level: 8
  • Requirement Information: N/A
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Pre-Requisites: N/A
  • Alternate Courses: N/A

8th grade Physical Science engages students in an exploration of the nature of matter and energy. The course is divided into two main parts, one physics-based and the other chemistry-based. Students will explore the periodic table, the structure of the atom, and the results of chemical and physical changes. They will also analyze the various ways in which energy is transferred, including forces, work, motion, heat, sound, light, electricity, and magnetism. Labs are frequent and will task students with recognizing how to systematically investigate physical phenomena using available data and trial and error. When possible, students will be encouraged to modify lab procedures to test their own hypotheses.

Honors Requirements: N/A

Physics

  • Instructor(s): Michael Russell
  • Grade Level: 11-12
  • Requirement Information: Fills 1 of 3 required High School Laboratory Science courses
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Pre-Requisites: Algebra II* (*recommended)
  • Alternate Courses: AP Biology, AP Chemistry, Research Topics in Biology, Research Topics in Chemistry

This full-year laboratory science elective explores the foundations of the physical sciences, including Newtonian mechanics, thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, vibrations, optics, and nuclear physics. An emphasis is placed on hands-on applications of concepts through labs, digital simulations, projects, and real world problem-solving. Additionally, students are given opportunities to apply their knowledge to model and analyze scenarios from popular media such as movies, comics, and video games. They are also given ample agency over the structure of labs and projects, including the focus of study, the layout of lab procedures, the organization of collected data, and the presentation of their solutions. Students should anticipate numerous opportunities to make connections to other scientific fields through open-ended problem prompts which prod them to discover unique solutions.

Honors Requirements: N/A

Research Topics in Biology

  • Instructor(s): Hillary Rupert
  • Grade Level: 11-12
  • Requirement Information: Fills 1 of 3 required High School Laboratory Science courses
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Pre-Requisites: Biology
  • Alternate Courses: Physics, AP Biology, AP Chemistry, Research Topics in Chemistry

offered during alternating years and will be offered in 2016-2017

This full-year laboratory science elective affords students an opportunity to fully engage in practical laboratory work as they explore core biology concepts. Students will become proficient in numerous research, lab, and data logging techniques as they conduct experiments, demonstrations, and projects targeted at developing an understanding of how “everyday” biology affects their lives. Throughout the year, students will be expected to design and implement their own laboratory experiments. Topics covered include Genetics, Forensics, Environmental Science, Sustainability, and biology-related current events.

Honors Requirements: N/A

Research Topics in Chemistry

  • Instructor(s): Patrick Gibbons
  • Grade Level: 11-12
  • Requirement Information: Fills 1 of 3 required High School Laboratory Science courses
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Pre-Requisites: Chemistry
  • Alternate Courses: Physics, AP Biology, AP Chemistry, Research Topics in Biology

This course is offered on alternating years and will not be offered in 2016-2017

This full-year laboratory science elective affords students an opportunity to fully engage in practical laboratory work as they explore core chemistry concepts. Students will become proficient in numerous research, lab, and data logging techniques as they conduct experiments, demonstrations, and projects targeted at developing an understanding of how “everyday” chemistry affects their lives. Throughout the year, students will be expected to design and implement their own laboratory experiments. Topics covered include Material Science, Kitchen Chemistry, Acids and Bases, Nuclear Chemistry, and chemistry-related current events.

Research Topics in Chemistry

  • Instructor(s): Patrick Gibbons
  • Grade Level: 11-12
  • Requirement Information: Fills 1 of 3 required High School Laboratory Science courses
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Pre-Requisites: Chemistry
  • Alternate Courses: Physics, AP Biology, AP Chemistry, Research Topics in Biology

offered during alternating years and will not be offered in 2016-2017

This full-year laboratory science elective affords students an opportunity to fully engage in practical laboratory work as they explore core chemistry concepts. Students will become proficient in numerous research, lab, and data logging techniques as they conduct experiments, demonstrations, and projects targeted at developing an understanding of how “everyday” chemistry affects their lives. Throughout the year, students will be expected to design and implement their own laboratory experiments. Topics covered include Material Science, Kitchen Chemistry, Acids and Bases, Nuclear Chemistry, and chemistry-related current events.

Life Science is the study of the basic biology concepts that are shared by all known living things. In this course, students will explore the diversity of our “living planet” by classifying organisms, exploring ecosystems, analyzing life forms at the cellular level, and studying the origin of and changes to live over time. As a laboratory science course, students will do many hands-on activities such as learning to use a compound microscope, taking detailed observation notes, and exploring the process of science in both controlled and real-world settings.

Honors Requirements: N/A


US Social Studies

AP US Government

  • Instructor: Colleen McCormick
  • Grade Level: 10-12th
  • Requirement Information: Fills 1 of 3 required Upper School History/Social Studies credits
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Pre-Requisites: N/A
  • Alternate Course/s: N/A

This course is offered during alternating years and will be offered in 2016-2017

This college-level course is an introduction to the US national government. We will study governmental institutions and political processes and examine policy choices. The institutions and policies of the US government will be considered in light of historical change, constitutional procedures, and comparative perspectives. This course is taken in preparation for the AP exam in May. Also, this class may be taken for college credit through the Rowan College at Burlington County CAP Program.

Cultural Geography

  • Instructor: Colleen McCormick
  • Grade Level: 7th
  • Requirement Information: Required for all seventh graders
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Pre-Requisites: N/A
  • Alternate Course/s: N/A

The goal of this course is to study the relationships between people, places, and the environment. The course is designed to give students a broader view of the world that will help shape their attitudes and lives in a constructive way. Using the text as a resource, as well as the Internet, the library, newspapers, and videos, students will explore issues which affect different countries today. In order to process geographic information, students will acquire the skills necessary to read maps and globes and see these in relation to themselves and their environment. Students will identify and understand the physical and cultural processes which create patterns on the surface of the earth, such as climate, erosion, urbanization, and transportation. These skills will be learned and demonstrated through text assignments, map study, research projects, and writing assignments.

US S.T.E.A.M

Doane Academy’s S.T.E.A.M. (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Mathematics) program is dedicated to developing a community of young tinkerers ready to tackle the 21st century with their creativity, individuality, and unique passions. Our S.T.E.A.M. courses seek to accomplish this by providing students with open-ended, collaborative class structures which encourage them to pull content knowledge from a wide variety of other subjects in pursuit of problem solutions which they can truly call their own.

For many schools, “S.T.E.M.” education is the push for more math, science, and engineering majors going into college. At Doane, we believe this approach is short-sighted. We insist on including the liberal arts - History, Band, Theater, Poetry, and so on - because they drive the creative and entrepreneurial spirit that can lead our young men and women to new discoveries we could never dream of. As such, our S.T.E.A.M. curriculum is as much about learning the engineering design process as it is about providing our students with the opportunity to test their own ideas in an environment that allows them to dream, make mistakes, refine designs, and eventually create a product which addresses the complexity of any problem.

Students enrolled in S.T.E.A.M. courses are challenged to be active participants in our annual events - including Project Green Challenge, Lower School Lab Week, Green Week, and the S.T.E.A.M. Fair - and to help guide the activities of our after school extracurriculars. By the time they graduate from Doane Academy, students who have capitalized on the opportunities our S.T.E.A.M. program presents will find themselves unafraid to generate big ideas and more than equipped to bring them to fruition.

* Course titles accompanied with an asterisk indicate an Honors Option. Selection of an Honors Option means the student is electing to do additional, more challenging work, requiring a higher level of critical thinking. These students will receive credit for honors level work.

Engineering Mechanics Honors

  • Instructor(s): Michael Russell
  • Grade Level: 11-12
  • Requirement Information: N/A
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Pre-Requisites: Pre-Calculus*, Instructor’s Approval (*Recommended)
  • Alternate Courses: N/A

This course is offered on alternating years and will be offered in 2016-2017

Engineering Mechanics, an Honors-level elective, is considered the culminating course in the Upper School S.T.E.A.M. program at Doane and is modelled after a collegiate-level “Statics and Mechanics of Materials” course traditionally taken by first-year Engineering majors. Students will learn to analyze bodies in two and three dimensions at mechanical equilibrium, and they will gain an introductory knowledge of how different materials respond to applied loads. Each trimester, students are challenged to apply concepts mastered to engineering design projects, including constructing balsawood structures and CAD modelling challenges. Students in this course should anticipate homework assignments and graded assessments which resemble those encountered in a collegiate-level engineering course.

Honors Requirements:

All students enrolling in Engineering Mechanics do so at the Honors level. Thus, they are expected to demonstrate the motivation, work ethic, and initiative commensurate to the course workload.

Middle School STEAM Cycle

  • Instructor(s): Michael Russell
  • Grade Level: 7-8
  • Requirement Information: N/A
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Pre-Requisites: N/A
  • Alternate Courses: Cycle 7, Cycle 8

Innovative Design

  • Instructor(s): Michael Russell
  • Grade Level: 9-12
  • Requirement Information: N/A
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Pre-Requisites: N/A
  • Alternate Courses: N/A

This course is offered on alternating years and will not be offered in 2016-2017

Innovative Design is the second of three Upper School S.T.E.A.M. courses offered at Doane Academy. In this course, students are challenged to develop products for open-ended, real-world problems while making ample use of their own creativity and interests. The course emphasizes using critical inquiry skills and available resources to develop meaningful solutions for complex issues. As such, students will have considerable control over how they choose to pursue a solution to a given problem and make use of available tools and materials in our makerspace classroom. Materials include textiles, woodworking, electrical circuits, and 3D CAD modelling and printing. Problem statements will challenge students to pull content knowledge from other courses and to consider how their solutions might make a positive impact on a community. Due to the changing nature of each year’s problems, a student may take the course twice during their high school career at Doane.

Honors Requirements: N/A

This full-year alternative to the 7th and 8th-grade cycles is the introductory Upper School S.T.E.A.M. course at Doane. In pursuit of developing the critical thinking and study skills necessary for success in High School and beyond, students will be introduced to the engineering design process and work collaboratively on nationally organized projects with the intent of competing against other schools in the region. As such, students will be expected to attend regular after school practices and all competition dates as a part of their course requirements beyond the classroom. Past projects include the National Engineers Week Future City competition, First LEGO League robotics competition, The $300 Home Project, and the National Rocketry Challenge. Due to the changing nature of each year’s challenges, students may take this course in both their 7th and 8th-grade years.

Honors Requirements: N/A


US World and Classical Language

7th grade Language Cycle

  • Instructor: Allison Baratta/ Anna Hall
  • Grade Level: 7
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Pre-Requisites: None

All 7th graders participate in a Language Cycle during which they will explore both Latin and Spanish at the introductory level. By taking both Latin and Spanish during the Language Cycle, students will be able to make an informed decision when they choose their language course of study. This decision will be made at the end of the second trimester after students have completed trimester-long courses in Latin and Spanish. Students will have the opportunity to learn about Roman history and culture and the diverse cultures of Spanish-speaking countries. In both courses, students will examine various aspects of language structure, grammar, and vocabulary in Spanish and Latin which will enhance and reinforce their understanding of English.

1st Trimester: Introduction to Latin, Part I:

During the first trimester, all 7th graders will take Introduction to Latin 1, Part 1, in which they will be introduced to the Latin language and Roman culture. A focus on grammar will provide students with insight into the structure of an inflected language that will contribute to their understanding of English as well as any further study in Latin or the Romance languages. Students will study the roots of many English words which are derived from Latin and improve their command of their own language by adding to their vocabulary. This course will provide students with a basis for further study of the Latin language by introducing them to concepts such as case, declension, and conjugation. In addition, students will learn about the Latin language through the historical lenses of life in the Roman Empire, a time period with vast influences on modern concepts of philosophy, art, architecture, law, and political science.

2nd Trimester: Introduction to Spanish, Part I

In this course, students will be introduced to Spanish language and culture. They will learn the phrases necessary to maintain communication in the target language during class, including greetings and goodbyes, pleasantries, telling time, giving the date, and talking about the weather. Students will learn to identify and describe the people and places at Doane Academy, tell where people are from, identify class subjects, and express opinions about their classes and extracurricular activities. Students will identify and describe the countries where Spanish is spoken. They will also compare schools and student life in the United States with those in Spanish-speaking countries. Students will build oral proficiency through interpersonal and presentational communication.

Learning activities will also include interactive writing assignments, as well as reading and listening comprehension tasks.

3rd Trimester: Introduction to Latin, Part II, OR Introduction to Spanish, Part II

Upon thoughtful reflection and after two trimesters of language courses, students will choose their 3rd-trimester class. In 8th grade, students will continue to study the language they select at this time.

Introduction to Latin, Part II:

In this course, students will continue to build upon the foundation laid in the first trimester. They will further their study of grammar to include tenses of verbs, more complicated sentence structures, interrogatives, and comparative adjectives. Cultural topics studied will include various forms of Roman entertainment, including theater, gladiatorial shows, public games, and baths. Students will also continue to read about life in the town of Pompeii prior to the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius.

Introduction to Spanish, Part II:

In this course, students will continue to build on the skills and knowledge introduced during the 2nd trimester. Through cross-cultural comparison, students will understand the cultures of Spanish speaking countries in relation to their own. Topics of study will include: Talking about family members and pets, describing a house and apartment, describing rooms and furnishings, identifying and expressing opinions about school and extra-curricular activities, describing a school uniform, shopping for clothing and school supplies, and talking about daily routines. Students will participate in a variety of oral presentations to improve their oral fluency and pronunciation.

Learning activities will also include interactive writing assignments, as well as reading and listening comprehension tasks.

8th-Grade Spanish

  • Instructor: TBD
  • Grade Level: 8th grade
  • Requirement Information: N/A
  • Duration: 1 Year
  • Pre-Requisites: Successful completion of the 7th grade Language Cycle at Doane Academy
  • Honors Option: No
  • Alternate course: Spanish I

This course is a continuation of the 7th Grade Language Cycle. Students will read, write, and speak in Spanish and develop listening comprehension skills in the target language. Students will review the phrases necessary to communicate in day-to-day situations in Spanish. Through the study of vocabulary, grammar, and cross-cultural comparison, students will explore the following topics: talking about meals and snacks, identifying food and drinks, ordering food and beverages in a restaurant, talking about soccer, basketball, baseball, and tennis, describing a sports uniform, identifying colors, describing personalities, health, and emotions, communicating with a doctor, talking about summer and winter weather and activities, discussing leisure activities, shopping for food and clothing, and airline travel. Students will narrate events in the present tense and express likes, dislikes, and preferences. They will also talk about past events with the preterite tense. Students will be expected to participate during class in the target language, and students’ oral proficiency will be frequently evaluated via formal and informal presentations. The textbook Así se dice, Level 1 will be used in 8th Grade Spanish. This course will prepare students to take Spanish II in 9th grade.

English as a Second Language

  • Instructor: Katie Sereduk
  • Grade Level: 9-12
  • Requirement Information: N/A
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Pre-Requisites: N/A

This course is designed for first and second-year international students attending Doane Academy. Students will improve their vocabulary, grammar, and communication skills in academic and social contexts. They are supported through the cultural transition of living and attending school in a new country. Students learn and practice strategies to succeed on the PSAT, SAT, ACT and TOEFL exams. In addition, they are offered weekly class time to receive additional help for their other academic classes. Throughout the course, students also study current events, analyze literature, write multi-draft essays, and participate in role-play activities all aimed at improving their proficiency in reading, writing, listening, and speaking in English.

Latin I

  • Instructor: Anna Hall
  • Grade Level: 8-12|Requirement Information: Fulfills 1 of 3 language credits when taken in high school.
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Alternate Course: Spanish I
  • Honors Option: No

Latin I is a full-year introductory course that covers the initial principles of grammar and sentence construction. Adhering to the Standards for Classical Language Learning, students are introduced to the basic forms and syntax of this highly inflected language, including six cases for the first three declensions of nouns, all four conjugations of verbs in the present and imperfect tenses, adjectives of three declensions, and the passive voice. Students develop techniques for memorizing vocabulary and word forms in order to acquire effective translation skills and enhance their command of their own language through increasing their knowledge of derivatives. Students will gain exposure to some of the greatest authors of Latin literature through reading adapted texts from authors ranging from the Early Republic to the Late Empire. In addition, students will study the mythological stories and the cultural lives of the nation that shaped Western Civilization. The textbook used for Latin I is Latin for the New Millennium, Part I.

Latin II

  • Instructor: Anna Hall
  • Grade Level: 8-12
  • Requirement Information: Fulfills 1 of 3 Language credits when taken in high school.
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Prerequisites: Latin I
  • Honors Option: No

Latin II builds upon the foundation started in Latin I and includes the major portion of grammar and morphology required to read authentic Latin literature. Students will add to their knowledge of the Latin language through learning all case uses and declensions for nouns and adjectives, all uses of pronouns, the six tenses of verbs in active and passive voice, and the three forms of the participle. Using Latin for the New Millennium, students will increase their translation skills through reading more complicated and challenging material based on adapted works from authors of the Early through Late Empire. The class resumes the study of Roman history and culture of the first century to include Roman law, provincial life, Roman recreation, and popular philosophies. Mythological studies will include the stories of famous Greek and Roman heroes such as Jason, Theseus, Hercules, Aeneas, Perseus, and the figures of the Trojan War.

Latin III

  • Instructor: Anna Hall
  • Grade Level: 9-12
  • Requirement Information: Fulfills 1 of 3 required Upper School Language credits
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Prerequisites: Latin II
  • Honors Option: No

Latin III is a full-year course in which students complete the study of grammar and the more complicated forms of Latin syntax so that they may gradually progress from reading adapted texts to reading only original texts. Topics studied include the passive voice, participles, the subjunctive mood in active and passive voice, noun clauses, indirect speech, clauses of fearing, and conditional statements. Using Latin for the New Millennium, Part II, the class is introduced to authentic Latin through readings taken from the Medieval Period through the Renaissance. Historical topics studied include the crossover of Rome from a Republic into an Empire, the literary circles of Rome, the impact of Greece on Roman culture, and the Age of Augustus. Mythological topics studied include traditional Italian deities and tales of transformation as told through Ovid’s Metamorphoses.

Latin IV

  • Instructor: Anna Hall
  • Grade Level: 10-12
  • Requirement Information: Fulfills 1 of 3 required Upper School Language credits
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Prerequisites: Latin III
  • Honors Option: No

This course with an alternating focus on either prose or poetry provides students with an introduction to authentic Latin literature. After a comprehensive review of morphology and syntax, students will start to read segments of Latin literature ranging from the Republican Period to the start of the Empire under Augustus and culminating with the middle of the Empire under Nero. Through exploring a range of texts from Roman history, students will gain insight into the minds that shaped an Empire which profoundly influenced our own society. In years focused on Latin Prose, students will read selections taken from Caesar’s Commentarii de Bello Gallico, Livy’s Ab Urbe Condita, Cicero and Seneca’s Epistulae, and Petronius’ Satyricon. In the 2016-2017 school year, students will focus on Latin poetry and read texts from Catullus’ Carmina, Vergil’s Aeneid, Horace’s Odes, Ovid’s Metamorphoses, and Martial’s Epigrammata.

Latin V

  • Instructor: Anna Hall
  • Grade Level: 10-12
  • Requirement Information: Fulfills 1 of 3 required Upper School Language credits
  • Duration: Full-Year
  • Prerequisites: Latin IV

This course with an alternating focus on either prose or poetry provides students with an introduction to authentic Latin literature. After a comprehensive review of morphology and syntax, students will start to read segments of Latin literature ranging from the Republican Period to the start of the Empire under Augustus and culminating with the middle of the Empire under Nero. Through exploring a range of texts from Roman history, students will gain insight into the minds that shaped an Empire which profoundly influenced our own society. In years focused on Latin Prose, students will read selections taken from Caesar’s Commentarii de Bello Gallico, Livy’s Ab Urbe Condita, Cicero and Seneca’s Epistulae, and Petronius’ Satyricon. In the 2016-2017 school year, students will focus on Latin poetry and read texts from Catullus’ Carmina, Vergil’s Aeneid, Horace’s Odes, Ovid’s Metamorphoses, and Martial’s Epigrammata.

Spanish I

  • Instructor: Allison Baratta
  • Grade Level:8-12
  • Requirement Information: Fulfills 1 of 3 required Upper School Language credits when taken in grades 9-12
  • Duration:Full-Year
  • Pre-Requisites: None
  • Alternate Course: Latin I
  • Honors Option:No

This course provides an introduction to the study of Spanish and is designed for students new to the language. Students will read, write, and speak in Spanish and develop listening comprehension skills in the target language. Students will learn the phrases necessary to communicate in day-to-day situations in Spanish. Through the study of vocabulary, grammar, and cross-cultural comparison, students will explore the following topics: greetings and goodbyes, pleasantries, telling time, days of the week, months, seasons, weather, giving the date, identifying and describing people and things, telling where someone is from, expressing opinions about classes, talking about family members and pets, describing a house and apartment, describing rooms and furnishings, school activities, school supplies, extra-curricular activities, describing a school uniform, shopping for clothing and school supplies, phrases that indicate location, talking about meals and snacks, identifying food and drinks, ordering food and beverages in a restaurant, talking about soccer, basketball, baseball, and tennis, describing a sports uniform, and identifying colors. Students will narrate events in the present tense and express likes, dislikes, and preferences. Students will also be introduced to a variety of study skills to help them learn a new language. Students will be expected to participate during class in the target language, and students’ oral proficiency will be frequently evaluated via formal and informal presentations. The textbook Así se dice, Level 1 will be used in Spanish I.

Spanish II

  • Instructor: TBD
  • Grade Level:9-12
  • Requirement Information: Fulfills 1 of 3 required Upper School Language credits when taken through grades 9-12
  • Duration:Full-Year
  • Pre-Requisites: Spanish I
  • Honors Option:No

Building on the foundation of grammar and vocabulary from Spanish I, students will continue to refine their communication skills in the target language and further understand Spanish-speaking cultures in relation to their own. Students will read increasingly complex texts and expand their written skills to include narration of past events. Spanish II students will be expected to communicate in the target language during class with increased attention to oral fluency and accurate pronunciation. Topics of study include: health and wellness, expressing emotions, visiting a doctor’s office, summer and winter activities, clothing and weather, celebrating a birthday, describing different types of movies, talking about going to the movies, describing concerts and music, discussing museums and art, shopping for food and clothing, numbers over 100, talking about price and payment for merchandise, travel preparations, airplane travel, parts of the body, describing daily routines, backpacking, and camping. The textbooks Así se dice Levels 1 and 2 will be used in Spanish II.

Spanish III

  • Instructor: TBD
  • Grade Levels: 9-12
  • Requirement Information: Fulfills 1 of 3 required Upper School Language credits
  • Duration: 1 Year
  • Pre-Requisites: Spanish II
  • Honors Option: No

Spanish III is a continuation of Spanish II. Students will continue to develop reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills in Spanish. Students will be required to learn increasingly complex grammar structures and incorporate a much wider range of vocabulary into their speech and writing. Students will advance their knowledge of the preterite tense to include many irregular verbs and will refine their ability to narrate the past using the preterit and imperfect tenses. They will also use the future tense and master the imperative form. Topics of study include: train travel, restaurants, different types of Hispanic food, holidays and festivals in Spanish-speaking countries, technology use, making and receiving phone calls, staying in hotels and hostels in Spanish-speaking countries, comparing city life to country life, and transportation. Students will continue to approach thematic units via cross-cultural study and inquiry. The textbook Así se dice, Level 2 will be used in Spanish III.

Spanish IV

  • Instructor: TBD
  • Grade Levels: 10-12
  • Requirement Information: Fulfills 1 of 3 required Upper School Language credits
  • Duration: 1 Year
  • Pre-Requisites: Spanish III
  • Honors Option: No

Spanish IV is a continuation of Spanish III. Students will be expected to incorporate highly complicated grammatical structures and a wide range of vocabulary into their writing and daily speech. Students’ oral and written expression will be evaluated frequently, and students will be introduced to more complicated texts to further develop their reading comprehension skills. Students will master narration in the past and present and gain familiarity using the future and conditional. They will also learn to use the subjunctive tense in a variety of situations. Topics of study will include: understanding traffic and auto travel in Spanish, writing and following recipes in Spanish, cooking Hispanic foods, physical fitness and exercise, discussing medical problems, talking about hospital visits, discussing weddings and milestones, chores, running errands and daily tasks, manners and culture-specific greetings and behavior, and travel. The textbook Así se dice, Level 3 will be used in Spanish 4.

Spanish V

  • Instructor: TBD
  • Grade Levels: 10-12
  • Requirement Information: Fulfills 1 of 3 required Upper School Language credits
  • Duration: 1 Year
  • Pre-Requisites: Spanish IV
  • Honors Option: No

Spanish V is a continuation of Spanish IV. The course structure will be similar to Spanish IV but at a more advanced level. Students will write complex essays and read poetry and literature in the target language. Students will refine their use of the subjunctive tense in a wider variety of situations, and they will also use a variety of perfect tenses and the conditional tense to talk about hypothetical situations. Topics of study will include: describing different types of holidays (weddings, baptisms, birthdays, and funerals); manners and courtesies; how to communicate in various day-to-day locales such as the bank, post office, hair salon, and the laundromat; manners and culture-specific greetings and behavior; traveling internationally; how to talk about and describe art and literature in Spanish; and the Latino experience in the United States. The cross-cultural analysis will continue to be the driving force of the curriculum, and students will be expected to communicate with advanced levels of fluency and expression. Spanish V will use the textbook Así se dice, Level 3.

Spanish VI

  • Instructor: TBD
  • Grade Levels: 11-12
  • Requirement Information: Students who register for this class will have completed their language graduation requirements
  • Duration: 1 Year
  • Pre-Requisites: Spanish V
  • Honors Option: No
Spanish VI is a continuation of Spanish V. Students enrolled in this class will have strong interests in completing further cultural studies and mastering their conversation and composition skills. Spanish VI will take an in-depth look at the literature and history of the Spanish-speaking world on both sides of the Atlantic. Students will read extensively, watch films, and examine art in order to develop a larger conception of the Spanish-language canon. Students will be required to participate exclusively in the target language in seminar-style discussions and will write complex essays to further improve and develop their academic writing in Spanish. This class will challenge students to integrate and refine the grammar and vocabulary skills they have learned in previous Spanish classes and apply them in a college preparatory setting. Topics of study will include: magical realism and the short stories of the Latin-American literary “boom,” the Spanish Civil War and the Generation of ‘27, and immigration and the contemporary Hispanic experience in the United States.

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A minimum of 6 credits are required each year in grades 9–12, and a minimum of 24 credits are required for graduation. Although Doane Academy has minimum requirements, most students aim for the maximum coursework they can complete in a given year.

Doane Academy operates on a trimester system. Each course carries a credit-weight reflecting the class time commitment: 0.33 credit for a single trimester, 0.66 credit for two trimesters, and 1 credit for a full-year course.

The Doane curricular system also includes ‘cycles’ for each grade level of courses, rotating by trimester, which focus on college preparation, character and leadership.

Click here to learn more about the Doane Academy Graduation Requirements.

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